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[公告] 「港台學術資訊」不是我的微博

Saturday, May 31, 2014

Ethical Treatment of Animals in Early Chinese Buddhism: Beliefs and Practices

Author:  
Pu Chengzhong 蒲成中(傳誠法師)

Publication Year: 
2014

Publisher: 
Cambridge Scholars Publishing

Abstract:

Through detailed discussions of several Buddhist and Chinese moral concepts and beliefs and accompanied by some edifying short stories, this book investigates three types of ethical treatment of animals in early Chinese Buddhism: the imperial bans on animal sacrifice; the early development of the two unique and living traditions of vegetarianism; and the freeing of animals. The book presents a demonstration of the early Chinese acceptance of Indian Buddhism, providing the reader with a better understanding of the early history of Chinese Buddhism in general, and of the integration of Chinese and Indian Buddhist cultures in particular.


Table of Contents:

Preface ........................................................................... vii

Abbreviations ................................................................... ix

Introduction ......................................................................1

Chapter One ..................................................................... 9
Governmental Prohibitions on Animal Sacrifices
1. Animal Sacrifice in Early China
2. Buddhist Views on the Killing of Animals
3. Edicts Prohibiting Animal Sacrifices and Killing Animals
during the 5th-7th Centuries
4. Conclusion

Chapter Two .....................................................................39
Chinese Buddhist Vegetarianism
1. Indian Buddhist Views on Meat Eating According to Chinese
Sources
2. The Vegetarian Tradition in Early China
3. Chinese Buddhist Vegetarians prior to the Imperial Campaign for
Vegetarianism
4. The Imperial Legitimisation of Vegetarianism for the Saṅgha
5. Conclusion

Chapter Three ................................................................101
The Buddhist Tradition of Releasing Animals
1. Releasing of Animals in Pre-Buddhist China
2. The Buddhist Practice of Releasing Animals Prior to the 5th Century
3. The Custom of Releasing Animals in 5th and 6th Century China
4. Conclusion

Chapter Four ...................................................................133
Animals in Chinese Moral Beliefs
1. The Features of the Early Chinese Ethical System
2. The Buddhist Doctrine of Moral Causality
3. The Integration of Chinese and Buddhist Moral Values
4. Recompense for Helping Animals
5. Consequences for Harming Animals
6. Conclusion

Conclusion ............................................................205

Appendix ..............................................................211

Bibliography ...................................................... 215

Index .................................................................263


Wednesday, May 28, 2014

中国中世仏教石刻の研究

Author:
氣賀澤保規 (Kegasawa, Yasunori)

Publication Year:
2013

Publisher:
勉誠出版

Abstract:
魏晋南北朝期から隋唐期にかけて、仏教は社会の隅々まで浸透し、「仏教社会」と規定できる時代が到来した。6世紀半ば以降の「末法到来」を起点とする時代に、仏教は中国においてどのように変容し、社会・文化に影響を与えていったのか。風雪に耐え、破壊も免れ、後の時代へと仏教信仰の痕跡を伝え続けてきた諸種の仏教石刻に着目することにより、当時の仏教信仰の社会的・歴史的展開を照らし出す。

Table of Contents:

序論 中国中世仏教石刻の地平 氣賀澤保規

第Ⅰ部 山東仏教石経の歴史的背景

山東泰嶧山区における刻経の新資料と北朝隋唐期の仏教 賴非 梶山智史訳

空王・空王仏・大空王仏―北朝末期仏教石刻に見る仏教の中国的変容― 手島一真

山東の摩崖刻経 ―諸訳・諸版本との比較結果、及び英訳の方針について― クラウディア・ヴェンツェル 羅翠恂訳

第Ⅱ部 山東仏教石刻の美術史的考察

隋時代の山東仏教造像について 八木春生

隋仁寿舎利塔と青州勝福寺址 長岡龍作

泉屋博古館所蔵「乾元孝義皇帝八国王等」銘舎利容器の空間構成 ウォーリー朗子

《コラム》悟りの時代:東アジア美術史におけるグローバルな視座―ロター・レダローゼ、アデル・シュロンブス両氏インタビュー― 羅翠恂訳

第Ⅲ部 中国中世仏教石刻の多様性と広がり

石碑の意匠「穿」について 徳泉さち

四川仏教石刻の性格 肥田路美

房山雲居寺石経事業と唐後半期の社会 氣賀澤保規

おわりに 氣賀澤保規




Monday, May 26, 2014

The Han Commanderies in Early Korean History

Editor: 
Mark E. Byington

Publisher: 
University of Hawaii Press 

Publication Year: 
2013




Abstract: 

This volume, consisting of ten chapters and an introduction, treats that period of the history of the Korean peninsula characterized by the presence of commanderies first established by the Chinese Han empire in 108 B.C. The ten chapters of this volume address such topics as the societies that preceded the commanderies, the history and material culture of the commanderies, particularly of Lelang, the political and cultural influence the commanderies exerted upon surrounding regions, and the structural character of the commanderies in Korea viewed in broad perspective.


Table of Contents:

Introduction by Mark E. Byington

"Scholarly Studies on the Han Commanderies in Korea" by Oh Youngchan and Mark E. Byington

"Old Chosŏn- Its History and Archaeology" by Song Ho Jung

"The History of Lelang Commandery" by Kwon O-jung

"The Ruling Class of Lelang Commandery" by Oh Youngchan

"The Material Culture of Lelang Commandery" by Jung In-seung

"The Samhan, Ye, and Wa in the Time of the Lelang and Daifang Commanderies" by Lee Sungsi

"The Fall of the Lelang and Daifang Commanderies and Its Aftermath" by Yeo Hokyu

Koguryŏ and the Reorganization of Xuantu Commandery" by Lee Seongje

"Lelang Commandery and Han China's Commandery-Based Rule" by Kim Byung-joon

"Historical Geography of the Han Commanderies in Korea" by Mark E. Byington



Thursday, May 22, 2014

Reading, Information, and Quantification in Traditional China

Place: UCLA

Program:

Friday, May 30, 2014
8:30–10:00 Session One: The Management of (Excessive) Data
Christopher M. B. Nugent (Williams College), “On Reading (or Not Reading) the Wenxuan 文選”

David Schaberg (UCLA), “On Reading the Yishi 繹史”
These two texts, the great medieval anthology Wenxuan (Selections of fine literature) and the late imperial historiographic work Yishi (Continuous history), represent two responses to the problem of copious data.  The Wenxuan served to curate literary knowledge for its age, culling the best works of each genre.  It was so influential that later scholars supposedly memorized the contents.  The Yishisought to renarrate Chinese history from the creation of civilization to the fall of the Qin, drawing upon much apocryphal material in an attempt to be complete.  Both texts raise questions of organization and access in regard to the preservation of data, as well as issues of how the data was then used by their readers. 
10:00–10:20 Coffee Break
10:20–11:50 Session Two: Experiments in Distant Reading
Jack W. Chen, Dave Shepard, Evan Nicoll-Johnson, Yunshuang Zhang, and Ruichuan Wu (UCLA), “On Reading the Quan Tang shi 全唐詩”

Ruth Mostern (UC Merced), “On Reading the Song Yuan difangzhi congshu 宋元地方誌叢書”
The Quan Tang shi (Complete Tang poems) collected over 49,000 poems from the Tang dynasty; as such, it is too massive to read using the conventional literary methods of close reading.  Similarly, the massive Song Yuan difangzhi congshu (Collectanea of gazeteers from the Song and Yuan dynasties) is a modern compendium of the gazeteers produced during the Song and Yuan dynasties, numbering over 8000 pages in all.  What reading entails for collections of this size is different from reading single units of text (such as a poem or a novel), necessitating the use of computational methodologies such as statistical analysis and GIS. 
11:50–1:30 Lunch
1:30–3:45 Session Three: Learning to Read and Write
        Robert Ashmore (UC Berkeley), “On Reading Dunhuang Letter
        Writing Manuals”   
Carla Nappi (University of British Columbia), “On Reading the Manju gisun-i oyonggo jorin-i bithe (Ch. Qingwen zhiyao 清文指要) Phrasebook”
Stephen West (Arizona State University), “On Reading between Encyclopedias and Commentaries”
The process of learning to read and write was always mediated through other texts.  In the case of Dunhuang letter writing manuals, this was a body of texts that novice writers used as models for their own writing, involving instruction in formulaic expression and proper etiquette.  As such, letter writing manuals provided a means of inculcating linguistic and cultural literacy — a purpose that could also be seen in phrasebooks for Manchu speakers hoping to master literary Chinese.  Works such as the Manju gisun-i oyonggo jorin-i bithe (Essentials of Qing writing) were, in effect, structured anthologies of excerpts and quotations that served as guides to learning to read on the scale of an entire language.  Similarly, for a general reading public desiring to understand popular literary works, a guide to the use of allusions was needed, taking the form of commentaries that drew upon middlebrow compendia, rimebooks, and distillations of earlier primers.  The commentary found in the 1499 edition of the Xixiang ji 西廂記 (Account of the western wing) is the earliest extant commentary to a vernacular language literary text and sheds light on the reading knowledge and habits of a vast non-elite audience.

Saturday, May 31, 2014
9:30–11:00 Session Four: On Reading a Large Bounded Corpus
Sarah Allen (Wellesley College) and Natasha Heller (UCLA), “On Reading the Taiping guangji 太平廣記”
The Taiping guangji (Broad records of the Taiping reign era) was a compilation of over 500 classical tales — ones that did not fit the canonical standards of theTaiping yulan 太平御覽 (Imperial browsings of the Taiping reign era), the anthology compiled for “imperial browsing.”  While individual tales from this anthology have been read and discussed, there is as yet no attempt at a macroscale reading of the entire anthology, one that not only discusses the organization of data by the total work, but also the complex relationships among the tales and what might be considered their thematic topologies.
11:00–11:20 Coffee Break
11:20–12:50 Session Five: On Reading a Large Unbounded Corpus
Bruce Rusk (University of British Columbia) and Yuming He (UC Davis), “On Reading Late Imperial Guidebooks to Elite Taste”
If the reading of the Taiping guangji presents a difficult exercise due to scale, this problem is magnified when dealing with an unbounded corpus — one defined not by a common editorial intelligence, but by a common thematic concern.  During the late Ming and early Qing, a vast number of commercial publications appeared, many of which promised readers insight into elite taste, particularly in matters of the decorative arts.  There have been impressionistic accounts of these publications, but thus far no systematic analysis of how such commercial works repurposed earlier material and represented them as standalone titles, serial publications, and sections of larger encyclopedic works.
12:50–2:00 Lunch
2:00–3:30 General Discussion of Next Steps


Tuesday, May 20, 2014

六朝文体論

Author: 
福井佳夫 (Fukui Yoshio) 

Publication Year: 
2014

Publisher: 
汲古書院

Table of Contents:

Ⅰ文体の種々相
第一章 文体と文体学
第二章 文体の変容
第三章 作風の使いわけ

Ⅱ修辞論
第四章 典故論――揚雄「百官箴」を中心に
第五章 対偶論――陸機「弁亡論」を中心に
第六章 助字論――美文における助字の省略

Ⅲ文体各論(両漢)
第七章 詔のジャンル――漢魏の作を中心に
第八章 上奏文のジャンル――鄒陽「獄中上書自明」を中心
第九章 碑文のジャンル――蔡邕の作を中心に
第十章 九錫文のジャンル――潘勖「冊魏公九錫文」を中心に
第十一章 檄文のジャンル――陳琳の作を中心に
第十二章 誄のジャンル――潘陸の作を中心に
第十三章 序のジャンル――別集序を中心に
第十四章 上書のジャンル――江淹「詣建平王上書」を中心に
第十五章 論難のジャンル――范縝「神滅論」を中心に
第十六章 班固における四言と五言――「漢書述」を中心に
第十七章 四言リズムの転進――詩から文へ
第十八章 詩と文の融合――六朝美文の到達点




Thursday, May 15, 2014

Refiguring East Asian Religious Art: Buddhist Devotion and Funerary Practice

Time: 
May 25-26, 2014

Place: 
The University of Chicago


Program:

May 25, 2014

OPENING REMARKS—Wu Hung

Panel I. FILIAL PIETY AND BUDDHIST ART PRODUCTION
Sun-ah Choi, Myongji University. “Is Filial Piety not Enough? Rethinking Issues about the Patronage of Sŏkgul-am and Pulguk-sa in Kyŏngju, Korea”

Youn-mi Kim, Yale University. “Buddhist Monument for Filial Piety? Intersection of Religious and Funerary Art in Silla”

Winston Kyan, University of Utah. “Between Caves and Tombs: Rethinking Representations of Buddhist Filial Sons”

Panel II. RELIGIOUS VISUAL CULTURE AND THE DEAD
Phillip E. Bloom, Indiana University. “‘How Grand Are the Uses of Texts!’: Documents, Messengers, and the Visual Imagination of Bureaucracy in Chinese Buddhist Liturgical Art”

Hsueh-man Shen, Institute of Fine Arts, New York University. “A Dance to the Music of Time”

Natasha Heller, University of California at Los Angeles. “Learning About the Dead: Children and Ritual in Visual Culture”


May 26, 2014

Panel III. RELICS AND RELIQUARIES
Katherine Tsiang, University of Chicago. “’Ashokan’ Reliquaries and Stupa Burials in Medieval China”

Akiko Walley, University of Oregon. “Fulfilling Wishes: Container Types in Buddhist Reliquaries and the Nature of the Salvific Power of the Relics of the Buddha”

Seunghye Lee, Academy of Buddhist Studies, Dongguk University. “The Hall of Underground Palace of Tianfeng Pagoda: Changing Form, Function, and Meaning of Reliquary Space in Southern Song China”

Panel IV. CONVERGING SACRED SPACES: TOMBS AND TEMPLES
Sonya S. Lee, University of Southern California. “The (Re)making of a Spirited Landscape: On Cliff Tombs and Buddhist Cave Temples in Leshan, Sichuan”

Wei-Cheng Lin, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. “Broken Buddhist Statues: the Death of Images and Their Changing Ontology Inside Pagoda Crypts”

Kate Lingley, University of Hawai’i at Manoa. “Kinship and the Commemoration of the Dead in Medieval Chinese Buddhist Monuments”

ROUND TABLE DISCUSSION
Paul Copp, Eugene Wang, Wu Hung


Unearthing the Changes: Recently Discovered Manuscripts of the Yi Jing (I Ching) and Related Texts 新出土竹簡《易經》與相關文本

Author: 
Edward L. Shaughnessy (夏含夷)

Publication Year:
2014

Publisher:
Columbia University Press

Abstract:

In recent years, three ancient manuscripts relating to the Yi jing (I Ching), or Classic of Changes, have been discovered. The earliest—the Shanghai Museum Zhou Yi—dates to about 300 B.C.E. and shows evidence of the text’s original circulation. The Guicang, or Returning to Be Stored, reflects another ancient Chinese divination tradition based on hexagrams similar to those of the Yi jing. In 1993, two manuscripts were found in a third-century B.C.E. tomb at Wangjiatai that contain almost exact parallels to the Guicang’s early quotations, supplying new information on the performance of early Chinese divination. Finally, the Fuyang Zhou Yi was excavated from the tomb of Xia Hou Zao, lord of Ruyin, who died in 165 B.C.E. Each line of this classic is followed by one or more generic prognostications similar to phrases found in the Yi jing, indicating exciting new ways the text was produced and used in the interpretation of divinations. 

Unearthing the Changes details the discovery and significance of the Shanghai Museum Zhou Yi, the Wangjiatai Guicang, and the Fuyang Zhou Yi, including full translations of the texts and additional evidence constructing a new narrative of the Yi jing’s writing and transmission in the first millennium B.C.E. An introduction situates the role of archaeology in the modern attempt to understand the Classic of Changes. By showing how the text emerged out of a popular tradition of divination, these newly unearthed manuscripts reveal an important religious dimension to its evolution.


Table of Contents:

List of Illustrations

List of Tables
Preface
Acknowledgments

1. Divining the Past, Divining the Future: Archaeology and the Rediscovery of the Changes

2. The Context, Content, and Significance of the Shanghai Museum Manuscript of the Zhou Yi 上博《周易》
3. Translation of the Shanghai Museum Manuscript of the Zhou Yi
4. The Wangjiatai Bamboo-Strip Manuscripts of the Gui cang  王家台《歸藏》
5. Translation of the Gui cang Fragments 
6. The Fuyang Zhou Yi Manuscript 阜陽《周易》
7. Translation of the Fuyang Zhou Yi Manuscript 
Conclusions and Conjectures

Notes
Works Cited
Index



Tuesday, May 13, 2014

[Conference] Empire, Ethics, and Tradition: An International Conference on the Han Dynasty

Place: University of Pittsburgh

Time: May 23- 24, 2014

Program: 


Friday, May 23


9:00 - 9:10  
Opening remarks
Vincent Leung and Michael Ing 

9:10 - 10:30  
Panel I: Philosophical Methods
Chair: Vincent Leung

"The Convergence Model and Philosophical Method in the Early Han"
Alexus McLeod, Colorado State University

"The Han Dynasty Philosopher Wang Chong and His Epistemology of Testimony"
Esther Klein, University of Sydney
Colin Klein, Macquarie University

10:50 - 12:00 
Panel II: Reading the Confucians
Chair: Vincent Leung 

“Mencius in the Han Dynasty”
Paul R. Goldin, University of Pennsylvania

“Regret and Lament in Early Confucian Thought”
Michael Ing, Indiana University Bloomington

12:00 - 1:30
Lunch

1:30 - 3:15
Panel III: Popular Beliefs
Chair: Michael Ing

"Coming to Terms with a Vulgar World: Wang Chong's Critique of Popular Religious Practices and the Realities of Practice Seen through Archaeology"
Jue Guo, Barnard College

"The Popularization of Natural Philosophy in Early China"
Ethan Harkness, New York University

"Echoes of the Xiwangmu 'Mystery Cult' in the Eastern Han"
Mark Csikszentmihalyi, University of California at Berkeley

3:35 - 4:45
Panel IV: Cosmology and Ethics
Chair: Michael Ing 

"Varieties of Yin and Yang in the Han: Implicit Mode and Substance Divisions in Heshanggong's Commentary on the Daodejing"
Misha Tadd, Peking University

"Hàn Views on the Source of Morality: Analogizing Using Biàn Hé's Jade"
Judson Murray, Wright State University


Saturday, May 24


10:00 - 11:45
Panel V: Space and Exchanges
Chair: Charles Sanft 

"Empire, Ethics, and the Afterlife Economy"
Tamara T. Chin, Brown University

"Spatial Disposition as a Strategic Concept in Early China"
Garret Olberding, University of Oklahoma

"The Chuci as an Imperial Artifact of the Han Dynasty"
Vincent Leung, University of Pittsburgh

11:40 - 1:30
Lunch

1:30 - 2:40
Panel VI: Capital and Borderland
Chair: Judson Murray 

"Communicating Beyond Borders in the Western Han"
Charles Sanft, University of Tennessee at Knoxville

"A Tale of Two Cities: The Move from Chang'an to Luoyang in Rhetoric and Reality"
Griet Vankeerberghen, McGill University

3:00 - 4:10
Panel VII: Mortuary Art
Chair: TBD

"The Disappearing Armies of the Han: Royal Terracotta Warrior Pits and Western Han Burial Culture"
Allison Miller, Southwestern University

"Mounted Archers, Empire, and the Han Mortuary Art"
Leslie Wallace, Coastal Carolina University

4:25 - 5:00
Panel VIII: Remembering the Han
Chair: Vincent Leung

"The Standard Histories of the Han Dynasty: A Quantitative and Qualitative Reading"
Nicolas Zufferey, University of Geneva

5:00
Concluding Remarks
Vincent Leung
Michael Ing

Monday, May 12, 2014

東アジア木簡学のために

Editor: 
角谷常子 (Sumiya, Tuneko)

Publication Year: 
2014

Publisher: 
汲古書院 Kyuko Shoin

Table of Contents:

第一部 中国・韓国の木簡 
木簡使用の変遷と意味(角谷常子) 
文書行政における常套句(冨谷至) 
古代東アジアにおける付札の展開(鷹取祐司) 
木簡の行方――唐代木簡の存否を考えるための覚書(藤田高夫) 
穀物の貸与と還納をめぐる文書行政システム一斑――東アジア古文書学の起点としての長沙呉簡(關尾史郎) 
韓国出土木簡と東アジア世界論――『論語』木簡を中心に(李成市) 

第二部 日本の木簡 
日本古代木簡の視覚機能(市大樹) 
荷札木簡に見える地名表記の多様性(舘野和己) 
考課・選叙の木簡と儀式(寺崎保広) 
書写技術の伝播と日本文字文化の基層(馬場基) 
墨書のある木製品とその機能――東アジア木簡学の確立のために(渡辺晃宏) 
歌木簡――文学と考古学の交差点(ジョシュア・フライドマン)



Saturday, May 10, 2014

Bronze Age China: Style and Material 青銅中國:形式與材質

Editor: 
Ying Wang

Publication Year: 
2010

Publisher: 
Cambridge Scholars Publishing

Abstract:

"Style" in Chinese art and archaeology encompass complex meanings that beyond studies of decorative motifs, design and traditional sense on artistic style. This anthology considers function, behavior, manufacture, usage, design, material and context are expanded definition of "style". Examine style in a larger context assists in investigating the aspects of life-style, gender, social structure, labor division, and craft specialization in a society, explains the social strata, rituals, and technical traditions. Scholars of this volume come from varied backgrounds, intends to achieve an understanding of the concept of material and style of Bronze Age while current excavated data are updated everyday in this particular field.


Table of Contents:

List of Figures............................................. vii 

Introduction ............................................... xi  Ying Wang 

Part I. Style Reconsidered 

Functional Style of Ceramics from Miaopu Locus North, Anyang, 
and Changes in Social Relations..................................... 3 
Minna Franck 

Stone Tools and Style in Chinese Archaeology: Zhongba Lithic 
Artifacts and Cultural Interaction in the Yangzi River Valley .................. 49 
Gwen P. Bennett 

Part II. Cultural Interactions and Media 

Style and Social Boundary in Bronze Age Southeast China ..................... 77 
Tianlong Jiao 

Interpreting the Stylistic Variation of Early Drums from Yunnan ............ 93 
Tzehuey Chiou-Peng 

Part III. Power and Belief 

The Fu of the Shang Dynasty: Women, Wives and Warriors.................. 117 
Mara A. Duckens 

Style and Belief: A Study of the Discoveries of Sanxingdui................... 129 
Shi Jinsong 

Glossary................................................ 187 
Bibliography............................................191 
Contributors............................................211


Thursday, May 8, 2014

呂太后期の権力構造:前漢初期「諸呂の乱」を手がかりに

Author: 
郭茵 (Yin, Guo)

Publication Year: 
2014

Publisher: 
九州大學出版會 (Kyushu University Press)

Table of Contents:

序章 本書の目的と先行研究
第一節 本書の目的
第二節 先行研究
第三節 本書の構成と概要

第一章 呂太后の権力基盤について
はじめに
第一節 楚漢戦争中の呂太后の行方
第二節 戚姫と趙王如意
第三節 太子の廃立と周呂侯呂沢
第四節 漢帝国樹立後の呂太后
第五節 呂太后の権力基盤
おわりに

第二章 漢初の南北軍
はじめに
第一節 南北軍に関する基本史料
第二節 先行研究における南北軍
第三節 諸説共通の問題点
第四節 究明すべきいくつかの事実
第五節 「諸呂の乱」の再現
第六節 前漢初期の長安における軍事力について
おわりに

第三章 劉邦期における官僚任用政策
はじめに
第一節 軍功と封侯
第二節 漢五年の三公九卿について
第三節 文武の対立と劉邦の統治理念
おわりに

第四章 呂太后の権力基盤の衰退と官僚任用政策の変化
はじめに
第一節 「怏怏」派の存在と曹参の任用
第二節 丞相権の分割と太尉の復活
第三節 呂太后の不安と側近の任用
第四節 呂氏一族の任用
第五節 九卿の任用について
おわりに

第五章 「諸呂の乱」における大臣と斉王兄弟
はじめに
第一節 「諸呂の乱」について
第二節 少帝弘をめぐる中央の情勢
第三節 斉王兄弟と大臣の目的及び少帝弘の身元について
第四節 「諸呂の乱」における大臣と斉王兄弟
第五節 「諸呂の乱」をめぐる動き
第六節 「諸呂の乱」の影響
おわりに

終章 本研究の結論と前漢史研究における意義
第一節 本研究の要約
第二節 前漢史研究における本研究の意義


Saturday, May 3, 2014

Zhuge Liang: Strategy, Achievements, and Writings 諸葛亮戰略

Author: 
Ralph D. Sawyer

Publisher: 
CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform

Publication Year: 
2014




Abstract:

A decidedly historic figure whose legend was increasingly magnified over the centuries, Zhuge Liang (Chu-ko Liang) has long been regarded as a brilliant strategist, commander, administrator, inventor, practitioner of the esoteric arts, originator of arcane wisdom, military thinker, and a sagacious king maker. His geostrategic insights rescued Liu Pei from extinction, resulting in China’s Three Kingdoms period, and his innovative tactics – including the “empty city ploy” -- reportedly resulted in defeating vastly superior, often befuddled foes. His escapades and achievements have become the subject of tales and novels, movies and tv serializations, and he looms large in war games and contemporary media. However, understanding his extensive military writings requires penetrating the myths and stories, discerning Chu-ko Liang’s real accomplishments, and acknowledging his shortcomings.

In addition to a complete, annotated translation of all his martial works and many of his missives and memorials, Zhuge Liang: Strategy, Achievements, and Writings contains an extensive historical introduction which outlines the military context, examines his strategic thought, and analyzes the numerous campaigns he personally directed after Liu Pei’s death. Insights from the Art of War and other classic Chinese military works well familiar to Chu-ko Liang are employed throughout.