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Monday, May 22, 2017

Workshop "The Good Life and the Art of Feeling: Emotions as Skills in Chinese and Graeco-Roman Ethics"

(via Warp, Weft, and Way: Chinese and Comparative Philosophy 中國哲學與比較哲學)

Venue:
Institute for Philosophy, University of Bern

Date:
June 7, 2017 - June 9, 2017


Agenda:

Wednesday, June 7

The Comparative Perspective. Introductory Remarks. 
David Machek, Richard King and Anders Sydskjør, University of Berne

9–10 Passion and Politics in Plato and Xunzi. Some remarks.
Richard King, University of Berne 

Znüni (Coffee Break)

10.30–11.30 Aristotle on Eating Sweets in Theatre and Akrasia.
David Machek, University ofBerne

11.30–12.30 The Epistemic Value of Emotions. 
Fabrice Teroni, University of Geneva

Zmittag (Lunch and Rest)

14–15 Cèyĭn in the Mencius.
Winnie Sung, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore

15–16 Naturalness and Excessiveness of Emotions in Cicero and the Peripatetics.
Georgia Tsouni, University of Berne

Zvieri (Coffee Break)

16.30–17.30 A Besire Theory of Action: The Significance of Wang Yangming's Liangzhi (Good Knowledge). 
Yong Huang, Chinese University of Hong kong

17.30–18.30 The Relation between Logos and Pathos in Evagrius's Praktikos. 
Kelly Harrison, University of Fribourg

Thursday, June 8

8–9 How Not to Feel What There Is to Feel: Cynic Apatheia, Atomist Ataraxia, Stoic Apatheia. 
Margaret Graver, Dartmouth College

9–10 Zhuangzi's Doctrine of No-Emotions. 
David Chai, Chinese University of Hong kong

10–11 Active Emotions in Stoicism: Feeling as a Kind of Doing. 
Brad Inwood, Yale University

Znüni (Coffee Break)

11.30–12.30 Responsiveness
(Ying) in Performance: A Relational Account of Self and World in the Zhuangzi. 
Karyn Lai, University of New South Wales, Sydney

12.30–13.30 How Passions
Give Way to Emotions in Stoicism. 
Vladimír Mikeš, Czech Academy of Sciences, Prague

Zmittag (Lunch and Rest)


Friday, May 19, 2017

Old Society, New Belief: Religious Transformation of China and Rome, ca. 1st-6th Centuries

Editors:
Mu-chou Poo, H. A. Drake, and Lisa Raphals

Publisher:
Oxford University Press

Publication Date:
June 2017




Abstract:

In the first century of the Common Era, two new belief systems entered long-established cultures with radically different outlooks and values: missionaries started to spread the teachings of Jesus of Nazareth in Rome and the Buddha in China. Rome and China were not only ancient cultures, but also cultures whose elites felt no need to receive the new beliefs. Yet a few centuries later the two new faiths had become so well-established that their names were virtually synonymous with the polities they had entered as strangers. Although there have been numerous studies addressing this phenomenon in each field, the difficulty of mastering the languages and literature of these two great cultures has prevented any sustained effort to compare the two influential religious traditions at their initial period of development.

This book brings together specialists in the history and religion of Rome and China with a twofold aim. First, it aims to show in some detail the similarities and differences each religion encountered in the process of merging into a new cultural environment. Second, by juxtaposing the familiar with the foreign, it also aims to capture aspects of this process that could otherwise be overlooked. This approach is based on the general proposition that, when a new religious belief begins to make contact with a society that has already had long honored beliefs, certain areas of contention will inevitably ensue and changes on both sides have to take place. There will be a dynamic interchange between the old and the new, not only on the narrowly defined level of "belief," but also on the entire cultural body that nurtures these beliefs. Thus, this book aims to reassess the nature of each of these religions, not as unique cultural phenomena but as part of the whole cultural dynamics of human societies.

Thursday, May 18, 2017

Les monnaies de la Chine ancienne: Des origines à la fin de l’Empire

Author:
Thierry, François

Publication Date:
May, 2017

Publisher:
Paris: Les Belles Lettres



Table of Contents:

INTRODUCTION 
Une remarquable anomalie
La conception chinoise de la monnaie 
Penser la monnaie 

I-DES ORIGINES A LA FIN DES ROYAUMES COMBATTANTS 
1- AUX ORIGINES DE LA MONNAIE 
A- Les cauris 
B- Une révolution : l’homme peut fabriquer de la monnaie 
C- Premières bêches et premiers couteaux 
2- LA MONETARISATION DE LA SOCIETE 
A- Le monnayage traditionnel des Royaumes Combattants. 
B - La valeur intrinsèque et ses limites 
C- Les pseudo-monnaies 

II-L’UNIFICATION MONETAIRE 
1- LES SOURCES ECRITES 
2-L’APPORT DE L’ARCHEOLOGIE 
A-Les fiches de Shuihudi
B- Les dépôts monétaires 
3-LA MONNAIE AU QIN 
A-Monnaies et circulation monétaire 
B-Une classification des banliang 
C-Les autres monnaies 
D-Les banliang de l’empire de Qin (220-206 av. J.-C.) 

III-LA MONNAIE DES HAN DE L’OUEST 
1-LA QUESTION DU MONOPOLE D’EMISSION 
Le peuple 
Les royaumes 
L’administration impériale 
La marche au monopole
2-LA SUCCESSION DES EMISSIONS MONETAIRES 
Les yujia banliang (209-175 av. J.-C.) 
Les bazhu qian (186 av. J.-C.) 
Les wufen qian (182 av. J.-C.) 
Les sizhu banliang (175 av. J.-C.)
Les sanzhu qian (140-136 av. J.-C.) 
Les banliang de Wudi (136 av. J.-C.) 
3-LE TEMPS DES REFORMES 
Les billets de cuir et les monnaies de métal blanc (119 av. J.-C.) 
Les junguo wuzhu (118-113 av. J.-C.) 
Les chice wuzhu (115-113 av. J.-C.) 
Les sanguan wuzhu (à partir de 118 av. J.-C.) 
4-LA CLASSIFICATION DES WUZHU DE WUDI ET DE SES SUCCESSEURS 


Saturday, May 13, 2017

A Pure Mind in a Clean Body: Bodily Care in the Buddhist Monasteries of Ancient India and China

Authors:
Ann Heirman & Mathieu Torck

Publication Year:
2013

Publisher:
Gent: Academia Press




Abstract:

Buddhist monasteries, in both Ancient India and China, rightfully attract the attention of many scholars, discussing historical backgrounds, institutional networks or influential masters. Still, some aspects of monastic life have not yet received the attention they deserve. This book therefore aims to study some of the most essential, but often overlooked, issues of Buddhist life, namely, practices and objects of bodily care. For monastic authors, bodily care primarily involves bathing, washing, cleaning, shaving and trimming the nails, activities of everyday life that are performed by lay people and monastics alike. In this sense, they provide a potential bridge between two worlds that are constantly interacting with each other: monastic people and their lay followers.


Friday, May 12, 2017

睡虎地秦简と墓葬からみた楚·秦·漢

Author:
松崎つね子 (Matsuzaki Tsuneko)

Publisher:
汲古書院

Publication Date:
April, 2017



Table of Contents:

解題に代えて(髙村武幸)

第一章 睡虎地一一号秦墓竹簡「編年記」よりみた墓主「喜」について

第二章 湖北における秦墓の被葬者について
――睡虎地一一号秦墓、被葬者「喜」と関連して――

第三章 楚・秦・漢墓の変遷より秦の統一をみる
――頭向・葬式・墓葬構造等を通じて――

第四章 戦国楚の木俑と鎮墓獣について

第五章 戦国秦漢の墓葬に見る地下世界の変遷
――馬王堆漢墓を手がかりに――

第六章 漆器烙印文字に見る秦漢髹漆工芸経営形態の変遷とその意味

第七章 「㳉」について
――『秦律』「效律」解釈を通じて――

第八章 睡虎地秦簡にみる秦の馬牛管理
――龍崗秦簡・馬王堆一号漢墓「副葬品目録」もあわせて――

第九章 睡虎地秦簡よりみた秦の家族と国家

第一〇章 睡虎地秦簡における「非公室告」・「家罪」

あとがき・編者後記・英文目次・中文目次・索 引

Saturday, May 6, 2017

Age of Empires: Art of the Qin and Han Dynasties

Editor:
Zhixin Sun

Publisher:
Metropolitan Museum of Art

Publication Date:
April 24, 2017



Abstract:
Age of Empires presents the art and culture of China during one of the most critical periods of its history – the four centuries from 221 B.C. to A.D. 200-- when, for the first time, people of diverse backgrounds were brought together under centralized imperial rule that fostered a new and unified identity. The Qin and Han empires represent the “classical” era of Chinese civilization, coinciding in both importance and timing with the Greco-Roman period in the West. Under the short-lived Qin and centuries-long Han, warring principalities were united under a common emperor, creating not only political and intellectual institutions but also the foundation for a Chinese art, culture, and national identity that lasted over two millennia.  Over 150 works from across the full breadth of Chinese artistic and decorative media-- including ceramics, metalwork, textiles, armor, sculpture, and jewelry – are featured in this book and attest to the unprecedented role of art in ancient Chinese culture. These stunning objects, among them soldiers from the renowned terracotta army of Qin Shihuang, China’s first emperor, are drawn from institutions and collections in China and appear here together for the first time.

Essays by leading scholars, accompanied by dazzling new photography of the objects, address the sweeping societal changes underway, and trace a progression from the early, formative years through unprecedented sophistication and technical accomplishment—embodied in an artistic legacy that reverberates in China’s national identity to this day.

Table of Contents:

1. The Making of China: The Establishement of a Lasting Political Paradigm and Cultural Identity During the Qin and Han Dynasties
(Zhixin Sun)

2. Qin and Han Political institutions and Administration
(Robin D. S. Yates)

3. Military Armaments of the Qin and Han
(Yang Hong)

4. The Qin and Han Imperial Citiy: Modeling and Visualizing Architecture
(Cary Y. Liu)

5. The Ingenuity of Qin-Han Craftsmanship
(Pengliang Lu) 

6. Popular Beliefs in the Qin an Han Dynasties
(Lillian Lan-ying Tseng 曾藍瑩) 

7. Qin-Han China and the Outside World
(I-tien Hsing 邢義田)

Monday, May 1, 2017

Origins of Chinese Political Philosophy: Studies in the Composition and Thought of the Shangshu (Classic of Documents)

Editors:
Martin Kern, and Dirk Meyer

Publisher:
Brill

Publication Date:
May 2017




Abstract:

Origins of Chinese Political Philosophy is the first book in any Western language to explore the composition, language, thought, and early history of the Shangshu (Classic of Documents), one of the pillars of the Chinese textual, intellectual, and political tradition. In examining the text from multiple disciplinary and intellectual perspectives, Origins of Chinese Political Philosophy challenges the traditional accounts of the nature and formation of the Shangshu and its individual chapters. As it analyzes in detail the central ideas and precepts given voice in the text, it further recasts the Shangshu as a collection of dynamic cultural products that expressed and shaped the political and intellectual discourses of different times and communities.


Table of Contents:

Introduction 1
Martin Kern and Dirk Meyer

1 Language and the Ideology of Kingship in the “Canon of Yao 堯典” 23
Martin Kern

2 Competing Voices in the Shangshu 62
Kai Vogelsang

3 Recontextualization and Memory Production: Debates on Rulership as
Reconstructed from “Gu ming” 顧命 106
Dirk Meyer